Table_1_Kinematics of Maximal Speed Sprinting With Different Running Speed, Leg Length, and Step Characteristics.docx (64.04 kB)
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Table_1_Kinematics of Maximal Speed Sprinting With Different Running Speed, Leg Length, and Step Characteristics.docx

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posted on 06.03.2020, 06:22 authored by Kenji Miyashiro, Ryu Nagahara, Kohei Yamamoto, Takahiko Nishijima

This study aimed to provide multiple regression equations taking into account differences in running speed, leg length, and step characteristics to predict kinematics of maximal speed sprinting. Seventy-nine male sprinters performed a maximal effort 60-m sprint, during which they were videoed through the section from the 40- to 50-m mark. From the video images, leg kinematic variables were obtained and used as dependent variables for multiple linear regression equation with predictors of running speed, leg length, step frequency, and swing/support ratio. Multiple regression equations to predict leg kinematics of maximal speed sprinting were successfully obtained. For swing leg kinematics, a significant regression model was obtained to predict thigh angle at the contralateral foot strike, maximal knee flexion and thigh lift angular velocities, and maximal leg backward swing velocity (adjusted R2 = 0.194–0.378, medium to large effect). For support leg kinematics, a significant regression model was obtained to predict knee flexion and extension angular displacements, maximal knee extension velocity, maximal leg backward swing angular velocity, and the other 13 kinematic variables (adjusted R2 = 0.134–0.757, medium to large effect). Based on the results, at a given leg length, faster maximal speed sprinting will be accompanied with greater thigh angle at the contralateral foot strike, greater maximal leg backward swing velocity during the swing phase, and smaller knee extension range during the support phase. Longer-legged sprinters will accomplish the same running speed with a greater thigh angle at contralateral foot strike, greater knee flexion range, and smaller maximal leg backward swing velocity during the support phase. At a given running speed and leg length, higher step frequencies will be achieved with a greater thigh angle at contralateral foot strike and smaller knee flexion and extension ranges during the support phase. At a given running speed, leg length and step frequency, a greater swing/support ratio will be accompanied with a greater thigh angle at contralateral foot strike and smaller knee extension angular displacement and velocity during the support phase. The regression equations obtained in this study will be useful for sprinters when trying to improve their maximal speed sprinting motion.

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