Table_1_Gut Microbiota Profiling in Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving Metronomic Chemotherapy of Capecitabine Compared to.xls (185.5 kB)
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Table_1_Gut Microbiota Profiling in Patients With HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving Metronomic Chemotherapy of Capecitabine Compared to Those Under Conventional Dosage.xls

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posted on 07.07.2020, 05:24 authored by Xiuwen Guan, Fei Ma, Xiaoying Sun, Chunxiao Li, Lixi Li, Fang Liang, Shaochuan Li, Zongbi Yi, Binliang Liu, Binghe Xu

Purpose: Low-dose metronomic chemotherapy can achieve disease control with reduced toxicity compared to conventional chemotherapy in maximum tolerated dose. Characterizing the gut microbiota of cancer patients under different dosage regimens may describe a new role of gut microbiota associated with drug efficacy. Therefore, we evaluated the composition and the function of gut microbiome associated with metronomic capecitabine compared to conventional dosage.

Methods: The fecal samples of HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer patients treated with capecitabine as maintenance chemotherapy were collected and analyzed by 16S ribosome RNA gene sequencing.

Results: A total of 15 patients treated with metronomic capecitabine were compared to 16 patients under a conventional dose. The unweighted-unifrac index of the metronomic group was statistically significantly lower than that of the routine group (P = 0.025). Besides that, the Bray–Curtis distance-based redundancy analysis illustrated that the microbial genera between the two groups can be separated partly. Nine Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) modules were enriched in the metronomic group, while no KEGG modules were significantly enriched in the routine group. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that the median progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly shorter in patients with the gut microbial composition of Slackia (9.2 vs. 32.7 months, P = 0.004), while the patients with Blautia obeum had a significantly prolonged PFS than those without (32.7 vs. 12.9 months, P = 0.013).

Conclusions: The proof-of-principle study suggested that the gut microbiota of patients receiving metronomic chemotherapy was different in terms of diversity, composition, and function from those under conventional chemotherapy, and the presence of specific bacterial species may act as microbial markers associated with drug resistance monitoring and prognostic evaluation.

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