Table_1_Genetic Dissection of Hybrid Performance and Heterosis for Yield-Related Traits in Maize.docx (22.53 kB)
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Table_1_Genetic Dissection of Hybrid Performance and Heterosis for Yield-Related Traits in Maize.docx

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posted on 30.11.2021, 06:26 authored by Dongdong Li, Zhiqiang Zhou, Xiaohuan Lu, Yong Jiang, Guoliang Li, Junhui Li, Haoying Wang, Shaojiang Chen, Xinhai Li, Tobias Würschum, Jochen C. Reif, Shizhong Xu, Mingshun Li, Wenxin Liu

Heterosis contributes a big proportion to hybrid performance in maize, especially for grain yield. It is attractive to explore the underlying genetic architecture of hybrid performance and heterosis. Considering its complexity, different from former mapping method, we developed a series of linear mixed models incorporating multiple polygenic covariance structures to quantify the contribution of each genetic component (additive, dominance, additive-by-additive, additive-by-dominance, and dominance-by-dominance) to hybrid performance and midparent heterosis variation and to identify significant additive and non-additive (dominance and epistatic) quantitative trait loci (QTL). Here, we developed a North Carolina II population by crossing 339 recombinant inbred lines with two elite lines (Chang7-2 and Mo17), resulting in two populations of hybrids signed as Chang7-2 × recombinant inbred lines and Mo17 × recombinant inbred lines, respectively. The results of a path analysis showed that kernel number per row and hundred grain weight contributed the most to the variation of grain yield. The heritability of midparent heterosis for 10 investigated traits ranged from 0.27 to 0.81. For the 10 traits, 21 main (additive and dominance) QTL for hybrid performance and 17 dominance QTL for midparent heterosis were identified in the pooled hybrid populations with two overlapping QTL. Several of the identified QTL showed pleiotropic effects. Significant epistatic QTL were also identified and were shown to play an important role in ear height variation. Genomic selection was used to assess the influence of QTL on prediction accuracy and to explore the strategy of heterosis utilization in maize breeding. Results showed that treating significant single nucleotide polymorphisms as fixed effects in the linear mixed model could improve the prediction accuracy under prediction schemes 2 and 3. In conclusion, the different analyses all substantiated the different genetic architecture of hybrid performance and midparent heterosis in maize. Dominance contributes the highest proportion to heterosis, especially for grain yield, however, epistasis contributes the highest proportion to hybrid performance of grain yield.

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