Table_1_Extracellular CIRP Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype in Pulmonary Fibroblasts via TLR4.docx (48.52 kB)
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Table_1_Extracellular CIRP Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype in Pulmonary Fibroblasts via TLR4.docx

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posted on 23.07.2021, 04:40 authored by Siavash Bolourani, Ezgi Sari, Max Brenner, Ping Wang

Extracellular cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (eCIRP), a new damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP), has been recently shown to play a critical role in promoting the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Although fibroblast activation is a critical component of the fibrotic process, the direct effects of eCIRP on fibroblasts have never been examined. We studied eCIRP’s role in the induction of inflammatory phenotype in pulmonary fibroblasts and its connection to bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. We found that eCIRP causes the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and differentially expression-related pathways in a TLR4-dependent manner in pulmonary fibroblasts. Our analysis further showed that the accessory pathways MD2 and Myd88 are involved in the induction of inflammatory phenotype. In order to study the connection of the enrichment of these pathways in priming the microenvironment for pulmonary fibrosis, we investigated the gene expression profile of lung tissues from mice subjected to bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis collected at various time points. We found that at day 14, which corresponds to the inflammatory-to-fibrotic transition phase after bleomycin injection, TLR4, MD2, and Myd88 were induced, and the transcriptome was differentially enriched for genes in those pathways. Furthermore, we also found that inflammatory cytokines gene expressions were induced, and the cellular responses to these inflammatory cytokines were differentially enriched on day 14. Overall, our results show that eCIRP induces inflammatory phenotype in pulmonary fibroblasts in a TLR4 dependent manner. This study sheds light on the mechanism by which eCIRP induced inflammatory fibroblasts, contributing to pulmonary fibrosis.

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