Table_1_Elucidation of Mechanisms of Topotecan-Induced Cell Death in Human Breast MCF-7 Cancer Cells by Gene Expression Analysis.XLSX (216.03 kB)

Table_1_Elucidation of Mechanisms of Topotecan-Induced Cell Death in Human Breast MCF-7 Cancer Cells by Gene Expression Analysis.XLSX

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posted on 17.07.2020, 14:41 by Birandra K. Sinha, Erik J. Tokar, Pierre R. Bushel

Topotecan is a clinically active anticancer agent for the management of various human tumors. While the principal mechanism of tumor cell killing by topotecan is due to its interactions with topoisomerase I and formation of DNA double-strand breaks, recent studies suggest that mechanisms involving generation of reactive free radicals and induction of oxidative stress may play a significant role in topotecan-dependent tumor cell death. We have shown that topotecan generates a topotecan radical following one-electron oxidation by a peroxidase-hydrogen peroxide system which reacts with reduced glutathione and cysteine, forming the glutathiyl and cysteinyl radicals, respectively. While little is known how these events are involved in topotecan-induced tumor cell death, we have now examined the effects of topotecan short (1 h) and long (24 h) exposure on global gene expression patterns using gene expression microarray analysis in human breast MCF-7 cancer cells, a wild-type p53 containing cell line. We show here that topotecan treatment significantly down-regulated estrogen receptor alpha (ERα/ESR1) and antiapoptotic BCL2 genes in addition to many other p53-regulated genes. Furthermore, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), ferredoxin reductase (FDXR), methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR), glutathione peroxidases (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GSR) genes were also differentially expressed by topotecan treatment. The differential expression of these genes was observed in a wild-type p53-containing breast ZR-75-1 tumor cell line following topotecan treatment. The involvement of reactive oxygen free radical sensor genes, the oxidative DNA damage (OGG1) repair gene and induction of pro-apoptotic genes suggest that reactive free radical species play a role in topotecan-induced tumor cell death.

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