Table_1_Dietary Different Replacement Levels of Fishmeal by Fish Silage Could Influence Growth of Litopenaeus vannamei by Regulating mTOR at Transcrip.DOCX (15.34 kB)

Table_1_Dietary Different Replacement Levels of Fishmeal by Fish Silage Could Influence Growth of Litopenaeus vannamei by Regulating mTOR at Transcriptional Level.DOCX

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posted on 06.05.2020 by Jianchun Shao, Lei Wang, Xuqing Shao, Mei Liu

Fish silage (FS) has been confirmed as a high-quality feed ingredient because of its balanced nutrition, low cost, and environmental friendliness. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of replacing fishmeal by FS in the diet of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Five isonitrogenous (410 g kg–1) and isolipidic (75 g kg–1) diets were formulated with replacement of fishmeal by 0% (FM), 25% (FS25%), 50% (FS50%), 75% (FS75%), and 100% (FS100%) FS. After an 8-week trial, shrimps fed low FS diets (FM and FS25%) had significantly higher final weight (FW), weight gain (WG), and specific growth ratio (SGR) (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in body composition and most antioxidant enzyme activities of all groups (P > 0.05). Compared to high FS groups (FS75% and FS100%), low FS replacement levels (0 and 25%) had enhanced trypsin activity. And trypsin transcriptional level presented a similar trend with trypsin activity. In terms of intestinal histopathology, no obvious histological damage was observed in the intestine of all groups. tor and s6k of low replacement level groups (FM and FS25%) were significantly upregulated (P < 0.05), which indicated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in low FS groups at transcriptional level. The enhanced performances of growth and mTOR signaling pathway in low FS groups (FM and FS25%) provided us some insights into the regulation mechanism of nutrient signal on growth. Based on the above, dietary FS could influence the growth of shrimp by regulating mTOR at the transcriptional level, and FS is a potential substitute of fishmeal in shrimp feed.

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