Table_1_Development of a Novel Simple Model to Predict Mortality in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.PDF (181.97 kB)
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Table_1_Development of a Novel Simple Model to Predict Mortality in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.PDF

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posted on 22.07.2021, 05:01 authored by Jinyan Guo, Zhen Huang, Maoxin Huang, Yujie He, Bing Han, Ning Ma, Zujiang Yu, Shengyun Liu, Zhigang Ren

Background: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may sometimes require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), and the outcome is poor. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical features of patients with SLE in the ICU, identify prognostic factors, and develop and evaluate a prognostic model to predict in-ICU mortality of patients with SLE.

Patients and Methods: This was a single center retrospective study in a tertiary medical institution in China. A total of 480 SLE patients with 505 ICU admissions from 2010 to 2019 were screened, and 391 patients were enrolled. The clinical feature and outcomes of the patients were analyzed. According to the random number table, patients were divided into two mutually exclusively groups named derivation (n = 293) and validation (n = 98). Prognostic factors were identified by a Cox model with Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation and evaluated by latent analysis. The risk score was developed based on the derivation group and evaluated using the validation group.

Results: Among the 391 patients, 348 (89.0%) patients were females. The median age of patients was 34 years, and the median course of SLE was 6 months. The median APACHE II and SLEDAI were 17 and 10, respectively. The average in-ICU mortality was 53.4% (95% CI, 48.5–58.4%). A total of 186 patients were admitted to the ICU due to infection. Pneumonia (320/391, 81.8%) was the most common clinical manifestation, followed by renal disease (246/391, 62.9%). Nine prognostic factors were identified. The model had C statistic of 0.912 (95% CI, 0.889–0.948) and 0.807 (95% CI 0.703–0.889), with predictive range of 5.2–98.3% and 6.3–94.7% for the derivation and validation groups, respectively. Based on distribution of the risk score, 25.3, 49.5, and 25.2% of patients were stratified into the high, average, and low-risk groups, with corresponding in-ICU mortality of 0.937, 0.593, and 0.118, respectively.

Conclusion: Nine prognostic factors including age, white blood cell count, alanine transaminase, uric acid, intracranial infection, shock, intracranial hemorrhage, respiratory failure, and cyclosporin A/tacrolimus usage were identified. A prognostic model was developed and evaluated to predict in-ICU mortality of patients with SLE. These findings may help clinicians to prognostically stratify patients into different risk groups of in-ICU mortality, and provide patients with intensive and targeted management.

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