Table_1_Community Metabolic Interactions, Vitamin Production and Prebiotic Potential of Medicinal Herbs Used for Immunomodulation.DOCX (659.97 kB)
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Table_1_Community Metabolic Interactions, Vitamin Production and Prebiotic Potential of Medicinal Herbs Used for Immunomodulation.DOCX

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posted on 03.02.2021, 04:21 by Christine T. Peterson, Stanislav N. Iablokov, Sasha Uchitel, Deepak Chopra, Josue Perez-Santiago, Dmitry A. Rodionov, Scott N. Peterson

Historically, the health benefits and immunomodulatory potential of medicinal herbs have been considered an intrinsic quality of the herb itself. We have hypothesized that the health benefits of medicinal herbs may be partially due to their prebiotic potential that alter gut microbiota leading to changes in short chain fatty acids and vitamin production or biotransformation of herb encoded molecules and secondary metabolites. Accumulating studies emphasize the relationship between the gut microbiota and host immune function. While largely unknown, these interactions are mediated by secreted microbial products that activate or repress a variety of immune cell types. Here we evaluated the effect of immunomodulatory, medicinal Ayurvedic herbs on gut microbiota in vitro using 16S rRNA sequencing to assess changes in community composition and functional potential. All immunomodulatory herbs displayed substantial prebiotic potential, targeting unique taxonomic groups. Application of genome reconstruction and analysis of biosynthetic capacity of herb selected communities suggests that many of the 11 herbs tested altered the community metabolism as the result of differential glycan harvest and sugar utilization and secreted products including multiple vitamins, butyrate, and propionate that may impact host physiology and immune function. Taken together, these results provide a useful framework for the further evaluation of these immunomodulatory herbs in vivo to maintain immune homeostasis or achieve desired regulation of immune components in the context of disease.

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