Table_1_Co-cultures of Glioma Stem Cells and Primary Neurons, Astrocytes, Microglia, and Endothelial Cells for Investigation of Intercellular Communic.XLSX (11.46 kB)

Table_1_Co-cultures of Glioma Stem Cells and Primary Neurons, Astrocytes, Microglia, and Endothelial Cells for Investigation of Intercellular Communication in the Brain.XLSX

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posted on 18.04.2019, 04:42 by Zhiyun Wei, Shubham Kale, Rachid El Fatimy, Rosalia Rabinovsky, Anna M. Krichevsky

Intercellular communication within complex biological and pathological systems via extracellular vesicles (EVs) and secreted factors is a highly attractive area of research. However, cell models enabling investigation of such communication in vitro are limited. Commonly utilized is the supplementation of hyper-concentrated EVs or other extracellular factors to the recipient cell cultures. This approach requires purification of the secreted complexes and is confounded by the contamination of media components. Two-chamber co-cultures of donor and recipient cells separated by a pore membrane may represent a more physiological and better-controlled system for the investigation of intercellular communication. Yet, distinct culture conditions for different neural cell types often make them incompatible for co-culturing. Here we optimized short-term co-cultures of patient-derived low-passage glioma-initiating stem cells with normal cells of the brain microenvironment, such as primary neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and brain endothelial cells. We demonstrate the culture compatibility of these cell types and internalization of glioma-derived extracellular RNA by the normal recipient cells. The presented protocols are valuable for the investigation of intercellular communication between glioma brain tumor and cells of its microenvironment, including but not limited to the EVs-mediated communication.

RESEARCH IN CONTEXT

Cell-to-cell communication is essential in normal physiology and implicated in disease; however, experimental systems for its modeling in vitro are limited. Particularly, the investigation of communication between brain tumors and normal cells of the brain microenvironment has been challenged by the lack of adequate culture models. Here we developed co-cultures of glioma stem cells with various types of normal brain cells, including primary neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and brain endothelial cells, and demonstrated their utility for the study of intercellular communication. Detection of proposed markers in the recipient cells confirmed RNA transfer in these co-cultures.

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