Table_1_Closing the Yield Gap for Cannabis: A Meta-Analysis of Factors Determining Cannabis Yield.XLSX (21.49 kB)

Table_1_Closing the Yield Gap for Cannabis: A Meta-Analysis of Factors Determining Cannabis Yield.XLSX

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posted on 24.04.2019, 05:38 by Rachel Backer, Timothy Schwinghamer, Phillip Rosenbaum, Vincent McCarty, Samuel Eichhorn Bilodeau, Dongmei Lyu, Md Bulbul Ahmed, George Robinson, Mark Lefsrud, Olivia Wilkins, Donald L. Smith

Until recently, the commercial production of Cannabis sativa was restricted to varieties that yielded high-quality fiber while producing low levels of the psychoactive cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In the last few years, a number of jurisdictions have legalized the production of medical and/or recreational cannabis with higher levels of THC, and other jurisdictions seem poised to follow suit. Consequently, demand for industrial-scale production of high yield cannabis with consistent cannabinoid profiles is expected to increase. In this paper we highlight that currently, projected annual production of cannabis is based largely on facility size, not yield per square meter. This meta-analysis of cannabis yields reported in scientific literature aimed to identify the main factors contributing to cannabis yield per plant, per square meter, and per W of lighting electricity. In line with previous research we found that variety, plant density, light intensity and fertilization influence cannabis yield and cannabinoid content; we also identified pot size, light type and duration of the flowering period as predictors of yield and THC accumulation. We provide insight into the critical role of light intensity, quality, and photoperiod in determining cannabis yields, with particular focus on the potential for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve growth and reduce energy requirements. We propose that the vast amount of genomics data currently available for cannabis can be used to better understand the effect of genotype on yield. Finally, we describe diversification that is likely to emerge in cannabis growing systems and examine the potential role of plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) for growth promotion, regulation of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and biocontrol.

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