Table_1_Changes in Perceived Exertion, Well-Being, and Recovery During Specific Judo Training: Impact of Training Period and Exercise Modality.XLSX (12.73 kB)

Table_1_Changes in Perceived Exertion, Well-Being, and Recovery During Specific Judo Training: Impact of Training Period and Exercise Modality.XLSX

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posted on 14.08.2020, 04:45 by Ibrahim Ouergui, Luca Paolo Ardigò, Okba Selmi, Danielle Evé Levitt, Hamdi Chtourou, Anissa Bouassida, Ezdine Bouhlel, Emerson Franchini

The present study investigated the effect of intense and tapering training periods using different exercise modalities (i.e., Randori – grip dispute practice without throwing technique, Uchi-komi – technique repetition training, and sprinting) on rating of perceived exertion (RPE), well-being indices, recovery state, and physical enjoyment in judo athletes. Sixty-one adolescent male and female judo athletes (age: 15 ± 1 years) were randomly assigned to one of three experimental or one control groups. Experimental groups (Randori, Uchi-komi, and running) trained four times per week for 4 weeks of intense training (in addition to their usual technical-tactical judo training; control group underwent only such a training) followed by 12 days of tapering. RPE, well-being indices [i.e., sleep, stress, fatigue, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS)], total quality of recovery (TQR), and physical enjoyment were measured every session. RPE, sleep, stress, fatigue, DOMS, Hooper index (HI; sum of wellbeing indices), and TQR were lower in the tapering compared with the intensified training period (P < 0.001). Moreover, the running group showed better values for sleep (P < 0.001), stress (P < 0.001), fatigue (P = 0.006), DOMS (P < 0.001), and HI (P < 0.001) in comparison with the other training groups, indicating a more negative state of wellbeing. The Randori and Uchi-komi groups showed higher values for TQR and physical enjoyment (both P < 0.001) than the running group, whereas RPE was lower in the control compared with all training groups (P < 0.001). Coaches should use more specific training modalities (i.e., Randori and Uchi-komi) during intensified training and should monitor well-being indices, RPE, and TQR during training periods. Moreover, for all variables, 12 days tapering period are beneficial for improving wellbeing and recovery after 4 weeks of intense training.

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