Table_1_Balance Adaptation While Standing on a Compliant Base Depends on the Current Sensory Condition in Healthy Young Adults.DOCX (19.39 kB)
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Table_1_Balance Adaptation While Standing on a Compliant Base Depends on the Current Sensory Condition in Healthy Young Adults.DOCX

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posted on 25.03.2022, 04:22 authored by Stefania Sozzi, Marco Schieppati
Background

Several investigations have addressed the process of balance adaptation to external perturbations. The adaptation during unperturbed stance has received little attention. Further, whether the current sensory conditions affect the adaptation rate has not been established. We have addressed the role of vision and haptic feedback on adaptation while standing on foam.

Methods

In 22 young subjects, the analysis of geometric (path length and sway area) and spectral variables (median frequency and mean level of both total spectrum and selected frequency windows) of the oscillation of the centre of feet pressure (CoP) identified the effects of vision, light-touch (LT) or both in the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) direction over 8 consecutive 90 s standing trials.

Results

Adaptation was obvious without vision (eyes closed; EC) and tenuous with vision (eyes open; EO). With trial repetition, path length and median frequency diminished with EC (p < 0.001) while sway area and mean level of the spectrum increased (p < 0.001). The low- and high-frequency range of the spectrum increased and decreased in AP and ML directions, respectively. Touch compared to no-touch enhanced the rate of increase of the low-frequency power (p < 0.05). Spectral differences in distinct sensory conditions persisted after adaptation.

Conclusion

Balance adaptation occurs during standing on foam. Adaptation leads to a progressive increase in the amplitude of the lowest frequencies of the spectrum and a concurrent decrease in the high-frequency range. Within this common behaviour, touch adds to its stabilising action a modest effect on the adaptation rate. Stabilisation is improved by favouring slow oscillations at the expense of sway minimisation. These findings are preliminary to investigations of balance problems in persons with sensory deficits, ageing, and peripheral or central nervous lesion.

History

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