Table_1_Altered Cerebellar-Cerebral Circuits in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.pdf (53.41 kB)
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Table_1_Altered Cerebellar-Cerebral Circuits in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.pdf

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posted on 24.09.2020, 04:21 authored by Dongsheng Zhang, Fei Qi, Jie Gao, Xuejiao Yan, Yarong Wang, Min Tang, Xia Zhe, Miao Cheng, Man Wang, Qingming Xie, Yu Su, Xiaoling Zhang

The role of the cerebellum in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been receiving increased attention. However, the functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellar subregions and the cerebral cortex has not been investigated in T2DM. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate cerebellar-cerebral FC and the relationship between FC and clinical/cognitive variables in patients with T2DM. A total of 34 patients with T2DM and 30 healthy controls were recruited for this study to receive a neuropsychological assessment and undergo resting-state FC. We selected four subregions of the cerebellum (bilateral lobules IX, right and left Crus I/II, and left lobule VI) as regions of interest (ROIs) to examine the differences in cerebellar-cerebral circuits in patients with T2DM compared to healthy controls. Correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between FC and clinical/cognitive variables in the patients. Compared to healthy controls, patients with T2DM showed significantly decreased cerebellar-cerebral FC in the default-mode network (DMN), executive control network (ECN), and visuospatial network (VSN). In the T2DM group, the FC between the left cerebellar lobule VI and the right precuneus was negatively correlated with the Trail Making Test A (TMT-A) score (r = −0.430, P = 0.013), after a Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, patients with T2DM have altered FC between the cerebellar subregions and the cerebral networks involved in cognitive and emotional processing. This suggests that a range of cerebellar-cerebral circuits may be involved in the neuropathology of T2DM cognitive dysfunction.

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