Table_1_A Systems Analysis With “Simplified Source-Sink Model” Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming in a Pair of Source-to-Sink Organs During Early Fruit Development in Tomato by LED Light Treatments.XLSX (11.2 kB)

Table_1_A Systems Analysis With “Simplified Source-Sink Model” Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming in a Pair of Source-to-Sink Organs During Early Fruit Development in Tomato by LED Light Treatments.XLSX

Download (11.2 kB)
dataset
posted on 10.10.2018, 09:28 by Atsushi Fukushima, Shoko Hikosaka, Makoto Kobayashi, Tomoko Nishizawa, Kazuki Saito, Eiji Goto, Miyako Kusano

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a model crop for studying development regulation and ripening in flesh fruits and vegetables. Supplementary light to maintain the optimal light environment can lead to the stable growth of tomatoes in greenhouses and areas without sufficient daily light integral. Technological advances in genome-wide molecular phenotyping have dramatically enhanced our understanding of metabolic shifts in the plant metabolism across tomato fruit development. However, comprehensive metabolic and transcriptional behaviors along the developmental process under supplementary light provided by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) remain to be fully elucidated. We present integrative omic approaches to identify the impact on the metabolism of a single tomato plant leaf exposed to monochromatic red LEDs of different intensities during the fruit development stage. Our special light delivery system, the “simplified source-sink model,” involves the exposure of a single leaf below the second truss to red LED light of different intensities. We evaluated fruit-size- and fruit-shape variations elicited by different light intensities. Our findings suggest that more than high-light treatment (500 μmol m-2 s-1) with the red LED light is required to accelerate fruit growth for 2 weeks after anthesis. To investigate transcriptomic and metabolomic changes in leaf- and fruit samples we used microarray-, RNA sequencing-, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. We found that metabolic shifts in the carbohydrate metabolism and in several key pathways contributed to fruit development, including ripening and cell-wall modification. Our findings suggest that the proposed workflow aids in the identification of key metabolites in the central metabolism that respond to monochromatic red-LED treatment and contribute to increase the fruit size of tomato plants. This study expands our understanding of systems-level responses mediated by low-, appropriate-, and high levels of red light irradiation in the fruit growth of tomato plants.

History

References

Licence

Exports