Table_1_A Protein-Linger Strategy Keeps the Plant On-Hold After Rehydration of Drought-Stressed Beta vulgaris.XLSX (10.23 kB)

Table_1_A Protein-Linger Strategy Keeps the Plant On-Hold After Rehydration of Drought-Stressed Beta vulgaris.XLSX

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posted on 29.03.2019 by Sebastian Schneider, Reinhard Turetschek, Rita Wedeking, Monika A. Wimmer, Stefanie Wienkoop

Most crop plants are exposed to intermittent drought periods. To cope with these continuous changes, plants need strategies to prevent themselves from exhaustive adjustment maneuvers. Drought stress recovery has been shown to be an active process, possibly involved in a drought memory effect allowing plants to better cope with recurrent aridity. An integrated understanding of the molecular processes of enhanced drought tolerance is required to tailor key networks for improved crop protection. During summer, prolonged periods of drought are the major reason for economic yield losses of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) in Europe. A drought stress and recovery time course experiment was carried out under controlled environmental conditions. In order to find regulatory key mechanisms enabling plants to rapidly react to periodic stress events, beets were either subjected to 11 days of progressive drought, or were drought stressed for 9 days followed by gradual rewatering for 14 days. Based on physiological measurements of leaf water relations and changes in different stress indicators, plants experienced a switch from moderate to severe water stress between day 9 and 11 of drought. The leaf proteome was analyzed, revealing induced protein pre-adjustment (prior to severe stress) and putative stress endurance processes. Three key protein targets, regulatory relevant during drought stress and with lingering levels of abundance upon rewatering were further exploited through their transcript performance. These three targets consist of a jasmonate induced, a salt-stress enhanced and a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein. The data demonstrate delayed protein responses to stress compared to their transcripts and indicate that the lingering mechanism is post-transcriptionally regulated. A set of lingering proteins is discussed with respect to a possible involvement in drought stress acclimation and memory effects.

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