Table_1_A Compost Treatment Acts as a Suppressive Agent in Phytophthora capsici – Cucurbita pepo Pathosystem by Modifying the Rhizosphere Microbiota.DOCX (13.42 kB)

Table_1_A Compost Treatment Acts as a Suppressive Agent in Phytophthora capsici – Cucurbita pepo Pathosystem by Modifying the Rhizosphere Microbiota.DOCX

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posted on 24.06.2020, 08:12 by Alessio Bellini, Ilario Ferrocino, Maria Alexandra Cucu, Massimo Pugliese, Angelo Garibaldi, Maria Lodovica Gullino

Phytophthora capsici Leonian (PHC) is a filamentous pathogen oomycete that causes root, fruit, foliar and crown rot over a wide host range, including the economically and nutritionally important summer squash (Cucurbita pepo var. cylindrica L.) crop. PHC chemical control strategies are difficult to adopt, due to the limited number of registered chemicals that are permitted and the scalar harvest system. For these reasons, other strategies, such as the use of waste-based composts that can act as suppressive agents against several soilborne pathogens, have been studied intensively. It is well known that compost’s microbiota plays an important role to confer its suppressive ability. In this study, four different composts were analyzed with both 16S rRNA gene and 18S rRNA gene real-time PCR amplification and with 26S gene amplicon-based sequencing; the total abundance of the bacterial and fungal communities was found to be higher compared to literature, thus confirming that the four composts were a good inoculum source for agricultural applications. The core mycobiota was mainly composed of 31 genera; nevertheless, it was possible to observe a clear predominance of the same few taxa in all the composts. The four composts were then tested, at different concentrations (1–10–20% v/v), to establish their ability to confer suppressiveness to the Phytophthora capsici (PHC) – Cucurbita pepo pathosystem in controlled greenhouse pot trials. A total of 12 compost mixtures were considered, and of these, one (Trichoderma-enriched compost at 10% v/v) was able to statistically reduce the disease incidence caused by PHC (by 50% compared to the untreated control). Hence, the microbiota composition of the most effective compost treatment was investigated and compared with untreated and chemical (metalaxyl) controls. Mycobiota sequencing showed genera differences between the three treatments, with relative abundances of several fungal genera that were significantly different among the samples. Moreover, PCA analyses clustered the compost treatment differently from the chemical and the untreated controls. These findings suggest that suppressive activity of a compost is strictly influenced by its microbiota and the applied dosage, but the ability to induce a shaping in the rhizosphere microbial composition is also required.

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