Table3_Proteomic Insights Into Susceptibility and Resistance to Chronic-Stress-Induced Depression or Anxiety in the Rat Striatum.XLSX (531.02 kB)
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Table3_Proteomic Insights Into Susceptibility and Resistance to Chronic-Stress-Induced Depression or Anxiety in the Rat Striatum.XLSX

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posted on 05.10.2021, 04:30 authored by Xiao Cai, Chen Yang, Jin Chen, Weibo Gong, Faping Yi, Wei Liao, Rongzhong Huang, Liang Xie, Jian Zhou

Chronic stress is a key factor for the onset of anxiety and depression disorders. However, the stress-induced common and unique molecular basis of the two psychiatric disorders is not fully known and still needs to be explored. Previously, we employed a chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure to induce a rat model including depression-susceptible (Dep-Sus), anxiety-susceptible (Anx-Sus), and insusceptible (Insus) cohorts. In this work, we continuously analyze the striatal proteomes of the three stressed cohorts by the use of comparative proteomics and bioinformatics approaches. Through isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based analysis, 386 abnormally expressed proteins in total were identified. These deregulated proteins are involved in various biological functions and significant pathways that are potentially connected with resistance and susceptibility to CMS-caused anxious- or depressive-like behaviors and, hence, could act as suggestive protein targets. A further parallel reaction monitoring-based independent investigation shows that alterations in Pak5, Dgkg, Scn4b, Rb1cc1, and Acin1; Ggps1, Fntb, Nudt19, Ufd1, and Ndufab1; and Dnajb12, Hbb2, Ap2s1, Ip6k1, and Stk4 were specifically connected with Dep-Sus, Anx-Sus, or Insus groups, respectively, potentially indicating that identical CMS treatment results in the different changes in the striatal protein regulations. Overall, our current proteomics study of the striatum provides an important molecular foundation and comprehensive insights into common and specific deregulations correlated with pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie resistance and susceptibility to chronic stress–induced anxiety or depression.

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