Table3_Identification of EMT-Related Genes and Prognostic Signature With Significant Implications on Biological Properties and Oncology Treatment of L.XLSX (159.43 kB)
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Table3_Identification of EMT-Related Genes and Prognostic Signature With Significant Implications on Biological Properties and Oncology Treatment of Lower Grade Gliomas.XLSX

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posted on 17.05.2022, 04:57 authored by Jiasheng Wu, Jinru He, Jiheng Zhang, Hang Ji, Nan Wang, Shuai Ma, Xiuwei Yan, Xin Gao, Jianyang Du, Zhihui Liu, Shaoshan Hu

The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process that drives progression, metastasis, and oncology treatment resistance in cancers. Also, the adjacent non-tumor tissue may affect the biological properties of cancers and have potential prognostic implications. Our study aimed to identify EMT-related genes in LGG samples, explore their impact on the biological properties of lower grade gliomas (LGG) through the multi-omics analysis, and reveal the potential mechanism by which adjacent non-tumor tissue participated in the malignant progression of LGG. Based on the 121 differentially expressed EMT-related genes between normal samples from the GTEx database and LGG samples in the TCGA cohort, we identified two subtypes and constructed EMTsig. Because of the genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic heterogeneity, malignant features including clinical traits, molecular traits, metabolism, anti-tumor immunity, and stemness features were different between samples with C1 and C2. In addition, EMTsig could also quantify the EMT levels, variation in prognosis, and oncology treatment sensitivity of LGG patients. Therefore, EMTsig could assist us in developing objective diagnostic tools and in optimizing therapeutic strategies for LGG patients. Notably, with the GSVA, we found that adjacent non-tumor tissue might participate in the progression, metastasis, and formation of the tumor microenvironment in LGG. Therefore, the potential prognostic implications of adjacent non-tumor tissue should be considered when performing clinical interventions for LGG patients. Overall, our study investigated and validated the effects of EMT-related genes on the biological properties from multiple perspectives, and provided new insights into the function of adjacent non-tumor tissue in the malignant progression of LGG.

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