Data_Sheet_3_Unpleasant Food Odors Modulate the Processing of Facial Expressions: An Event-Related Potential Study.ZIP (1.14 MB)

Data_Sheet_3_Unpleasant Food Odors Modulate the Processing of Facial Expressions: An Event-Related Potential Study.ZIP

Download (1.14 MB)
dataset
posted on 30.06.2020, 06:56 by Danyang Li, Jiafeng Jia, Xiaochun Wang

In real-life situations, emotional information is often expressed through multiple sensory channels, with cross-talk between channels. Previous research has established that odor environments regulate the recognition of facial expressions. Therefore, this study combined event-related potentials (ERPs) with a facial emotion recognition task to investigate the effect of food odor context on the recognition of facial expressions and its time course. Fifty-four participants were asked to identify happy, fearful, and neutral faces in an odor context (pleasant, unpleasant or neutral). Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed to extract event-related potentials (ERPs). Behaviorally, unpleasant food odors triggered faster recognition of facial expressions, especially fearful ones. ERP results found that in the early stage, unpleasant food odors within 80–110 ms evoked a larger P100 amplitude than pleasant food odors and no odors, which showed that the unpleasant odor environment promoted the rapid processing of facial expressions. Next, the interaction between odor environment and facial expressions occurred during the middle stage, and the fearful expression evoked a smaller VPP (vertex positive potential) amplitude than the happy and neutral expressions when exposed to the unpleasant food odor environment. This result indicates that unpleasant odor environment consumed fewer cognitive resources when judging fearful expression, showing the promoting effect of mood coherence effect. These findings provided evidence for how people chose odor environments to facilitate the recognition of facial expressions, and highlighted the advantages of unpleasant food odors in communicating emotional information across the olfactory and visual pathways.

History

References

Licence

Exports