Data_Sheet_2_The COM-Poisson Process for Stochastic Modeling of Osmotic Inactivation Dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes.docx (669.25 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_The COM-Poisson Process for Stochastic Modeling of Osmotic Inactivation Dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes.docx

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posted on 09.07.2021, 14:07 by Pierluigi Polese, Manuela Del Torre, Mara Lucia Stecchini

Controlling harmful microorganisms, such as Listeria monocytogenes, can require reliable inactivation steps, including those providing conditions (e.g., using high salt content) in which the pathogen could be progressively inactivated. Exposure to osmotic stress could result, however, in variation in the number of survivors, which needs to be carefully considered through appropriate dispersion measures for its impact on intervention practices. Variation in the experimental observations is due to uncertainty and biological variability in the microbial response. The Poisson distribution is suitable for modeling the variation of equi-dispersed count data when the naturally occurring randomness in bacterial numbers it is assumed. However, violation of equi-dispersion is quite often evident, leading to over-dispersion, i.e., non-randomness. This article proposes a statistical modeling approach for describing variation in osmotic inactivation of L. monocytogenes Scott A at different initial cell levels. The change of survivors over inactivation time was described as an exponential function in both the Poisson and in the Conway-Maxwell Poisson (COM-Poisson) processes, with the latter dealing with over-dispersion through a dispersion parameter. This parameter was modeled to describe the occurrence of non-randomness in the population distribution, even the one emerging with the osmotic treatment. The results revealed that the contribution of randomness to the total variance was dominant only on the lower-count survivors, while at higher counts the non-randomness contribution to the variance was shown to increase the total variance above the Poisson distribution. When the inactivation model was compared with random numbers generated in computer simulation, a good concordance between the experimental and the modeled data was obtained in the COM-Poisson process.

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