Data_Sheet_2_Induction of Acquired Tolerance Through Gradual Progression of Drought Is the Key for Maintenance of Spikelet Fertility and Yield in Rice.pdf (157.02 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_Induction of Acquired Tolerance Through Gradual Progression of Drought Is the Key for Maintenance of Spikelet Fertility and Yield in Rice Under Semi-irrigated Aerobic Conditions.pdf

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posted on 18.02.2021, 05:42 by V. S. Lekshmy, Preethi Vijayaraghavareddy, A. N. Nagashree, Vemanna S. Ramu, Venkategowda Ramegowda, Udayakumar Makarla, Sheshshayee Sreeman

Plants have evolved several adaptive mechanisms to cope with water-limited conditions. While most of them are through constitutive traits, certain “acquired tolerance” traits also provide significant improvement in drought adaptation. Most abiotic stresses, especially drought, show a gradual progression of stress and hence provide an opportunity to upregulate specific protective mechanisms collectively referred to as “acquired tolerance” traits. Here, we demonstrate a significant genetic variability in acquired tolerance traits among rice germplasm accessions after standardizing a novel gradual stress progress protocol. Two contrasting genotypes, BPT 5204 (drought susceptible) and AC 39000 (tolerant), were used to standardize methodology for capturing acquired tolerance traits at seedling phase. Seedlings exposed to gradual progression of stress showed higher recovery with low free radical accumulation in both the genotypes compared to rapid stress. Further, the gradual stress progression protocol was used to examine the role of acquired tolerance at flowering phase using a set of 17 diverse rice genotypes. Significant diversity in free radical production and scavenging was observed among these genotypes. Association of these parameters with yield attributes showed that genotypes that managed free radical levels in cells were able to maintain high spikelet fertility and hence yield under stress. This study, besides emphasizing the importance of acquired tolerance, explains a high throughput phenotyping approach that significantly overcomes methodological constraints in assessing genetic variability in this important drought adaptive mechanism.

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