Data_Sheet_2_Inability of Low Oxygen Tension to Induce Chondrogenesis in Human Infrapatellar Fat Pad Mesenchymal Stem Cells.docx (668.61 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_Inability of Low Oxygen Tension to Induce Chondrogenesis in Human Infrapatellar Fat Pad Mesenchymal Stem Cells.docx

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posted on 26.07.2021, 04:49 by Samia Rahman, Alexander R. A. Szojka, Yan Liang, Melanie Kunze, Victoria Goncalves, Aillette Mulet-Sierra, Nadr M. Jomha, Adetola B. Adesida
Objective

Articular cartilage of the knee joint is avascular, exists under a low oxygen tension microenvironment, and does not self-heal when injured. Human infrapatellar fat pad-sourced mesenchymal stem cells (IFP-MSC) are an arthroscopically accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Human IFP-MSC exists physiologically under a low oxygen tension (i.e., 1–5%) microenvironment. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) exist physiologically within a similar range of oxygen tension. A low oxygen tension of 2% spontaneously induced chondrogenesis in micromass pellets of human BM-MSC. However, this is yet to be demonstrated in human IFP-MSC or other adipose tissue-sourced MSC. In this study, we explored the potential of low oxygen tension at 2% to drive the in vitro chondrogenesis of IFP-MSC. We hypothesized that 2% O2 will induce stable chondrogenesis in human IFP-MSC without the risk of undergoing endochondral ossification at ectopic sites of implantation.

Methods

Micromass pellets of human IFP-MSC were cultured under 2% O2 or 21% O2 (normal atmosphere O2) in the presence or absence of chondrogenic medium with transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3) for 3 weeks. Following in vitro chondrogenesis, the resulting pellets were implanted in immunodeficient athymic nude mice for 3 weeks.

Results

A low oxygen tension of 2% was unable to induce chondrogenesis in human IFP-MSC. In contrast, chondrogenic medium with TGFβ3 induced in vitro chondrogenesis. All pellets were devoid of any evidence of undergoing endochondral ossification after subcutaneous implantation in athymic mice.

History

References