Data_Sheet_2_From Forest Soil to the Canopy: Increased Habitat Diversity Does Not Increase Species Richness of Cercozoa and Oomycota in Tree Canopies.pdf (518.3 kB)

Data_Sheet_2_From Forest Soil to the Canopy: Increased Habitat Diversity Does Not Increase Species Richness of Cercozoa and Oomycota in Tree Canopies.pdf

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posted on 22.12.2020, 04:07 by Robin-Tobias Jauss, Susanne Walden, Anna Maria Fiore-Donno, Kenneth Dumack, Stefan Schaffer, Ronny Wolf, Martin Schlegel, Michael Bonkowski

Tree canopies provide habitats for diverse and until now, still poorly characterized communities of microbial eukaryotes. One of the most general patterns in community ecology is the increase in species richness with increasing habitat diversity. Thus, environmental heterogeneity of tree canopies should be an important factor governing community structure and diversity in this subsystem of forest ecosystems. Nevertheless, it is unknown if similar patterns are reflected at the microbial scale within unicellular eukaryotes (protists). In this study, high-throughput sequencing of two prominent protistan taxa, Cercozoa (Rhizaria) and Oomycota (Stramenopiles), was performed. Group specific primers were used to comprehensively analyze their diversity in various microhabitats of a floodplain forest from the forest floor to the canopy region. Beta diversity indicated highly dissimilar protistan communities in the investigated microhabitats. However, the majority of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was present in all samples, and therefore differences in beta diversity were mainly related to species performance (i.e., relative abundance). Accordingly, habitat diversity strongly favored distinct protistan taxa in terms of abundance, but due to their almost ubiquitous distribution the effect of species richness on community composition was negligible.

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