Data_Sheet_2_Construction of a Promising Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells Gene Signature to Improve Prediction of the Prognosis and Immune Response of .CSV (22.88 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_Construction of a Promising Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells Gene Signature to Improve Prediction of the Prognosis and Immune Response of Uveal Melanoma.CSV

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posted on 28.05.2021, 06:54 by Yifang Sun, Jian Wu, Yonggang Yuan, Yumin Lu, Ming Luo, Ling Lin, Shengsheng Ma
Background

CD8+ T cells work as a key effector of adaptive immunity and are closely associated with immune response for killing tumor cells. It is crucial to understand the role of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells in uveal melanoma (UM) to predict the prognosis and response to immunotherapy.

Materials and Methods

Single-cell transcriptomes of UM with immune-related genes were combined to screen the CD8+ T-cell-associated immune-related genes (CDIRGs) for subsequent analysis. Next, a prognostic gene signature referred to tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells was constructed and validated in several UM bulk RNA sequencing datasets. The risk score of UM patients was calculated and classified into high- or low-risk subgroup. The prognostic value of risk score was estimated by using multivariate Cox analysis and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. Moreover, the potential ability of gene signature for predicting immunotherapy response was further explored.

Results

In total, 202 CDIRGs were screened out from the single-cell RNA sequencing of GSE139829. Next, a gene signature containing three CDIRGs (IFNGR1, ANXA6, and TANK) was identified, which was considered as an independent prognostic indicator to robustly predict overall survival (OS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) of UM. In addition, the UM patients were classified into high- and low-risk subgroups with different clinical characteristics, distinct CD8+ T-cell immune infiltration, and immunotherapy response. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that immune pathways such as allograft rejection, inflammatory response, interferon alpha and gamma response, and antigen processing and presentation were all positively activated in low-risk phenotype.

Conclusion

Our work gives an inspiration to explain the limited response for the current immune checkpoint inhibitors to UM. Besides, we constructed a novel gene signature to predict prognosis and immunotherapy responses, which may be regarded as a promising therapeutic target.

History

References