Data_Sheet_2_Cobetia sp. Bacteria, Which Are Capable of Utilizing Alginate or Waste Laminaria sp. for Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Synthesis, Isolated From.DOCX (522.67 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_Cobetia sp. Bacteria, Which Are Capable of Utilizing Alginate or Waste Laminaria sp. for Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Synthesis, Isolated From a Marine Environment.DOCX

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posted on 25.08.2020, 04:03 authored by Hiroki Moriya, Yuto Takita, Akira Matsumoto, Yuki Yamahata, Megumi Nishimukai, Masao Miyazaki, Hitoshi Shimoi, Sung-Jin Kawai, Miwa Yamada

We isolated the Cobetia sp. strains IU 180733JP01 (5-11-6-3) and 190790JP01 (5-25-4-2) from seaweeds and showed that both strains accumulate poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] homopolymer in a nitrogen-limiting mineral salt medium containing alginate as a sole carbon source. Genome sequence analysis of the isolated strains showed that they have putative genes which encode enzymes relevant to alginate assimilation and P(3HB) synthesis, and the putative alginate-assimilating genes formed a cluster. Investigation of the optimum culture conditions for high accumulation of P(3HB) showed that when the 5-11-6-3 strain was cultured in a nitrogen-limiting mineral salt medium (pH 5.0) containing 6% NaCl and 3% (w/v) alginate as a sole carbon source for 2 days, the P(3HB) content and P(3HB) production reached 62.1 ± 3.4 wt% and 3.11 ± 0.16 g/L, respectively. When the 5-25-4-2 strain was cultured in a nitrogen-limiting mineral salt medium (pH 4.0) containing 5% NaCl and 3% (w/v) alginate for 2 days, the P(3HB) content and P(3HB) production reached 56.9 ± 2.1 wt% and 2.67 ± 0.11 g/L, respectively. Moreover, the 5-11-6-3 strain also produced P(3HB) in a nitrogen-limiting mineral salt medium (pH 5.0) containing 6% NaCl and freeze-dried and crushed waste Laminaria sp., which is classified into brown algae and contains alginate abundantly. The resulting P(3HB) content and P(3HB) productivity were 13.5 ± 0.13 wt% and 3.99 ± 0.15 mg/L/h, respectively. Thus, we demonstrated the potential application of the isolated strains to a simple P(3HB) production process from seaweeds without chemical hydrolysis and enzymatic saccharification.

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