Data_Sheet_2_Association of Maternal Factors and HIV Infection With Innate Cytokine Responses of Delivering Mothers and Newborns in Mozambique.CSV (4.38 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_Association of Maternal Factors and HIV Infection With Innate Cytokine Responses of Delivering Mothers and Newborns in Mozambique.CSV

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posted on 14.07.2020, 04:31 authored by Gemma Moncunill, Carlota Dobaño, Raquel González, Kinga K. Smolen, Maria N. Manaca, Reyes Balcells, Chenjerai Jairoce, Pau Cisteró, Anifa Vala, Esperança Sevene, María Rupérez, John J. Aponte, Eusébio Macete, Clara Menéndez, Tobias R. Kollmann, Alfredo Mayor

Maternal factors and exposure to pathogens have an impact on infant health. For instance, HIV exposed but uninfected infants have higher morbidity and mortality than HIV unexposed infants. Innate responses are the first line of defense and orchestrate the subsequent adaptive immune response and are especially relevant in newborns. To determine the association of maternal HIV infection with maternal and newborn innate immunity we analyzed the cytokine responses upon pattern recognition receptor (PRR) stimulations in the triad of maternal peripheral and placental blood as well as in cord blood in a cohort of mother-infant pairs from southern Mozambique. A total of 48 women (35 HIV-uninfected and 13 HIV-infected) were included. Women and infant innate responses positively correlated with each other. Age, gravidity and sex of the fetus had some associations with spontaneous production of cytokines in the maternal peripheral blood. HIV-infected women not receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) before pregnancy showed decreased IL-8 and IL-6 PRR responses in peripheral blood compared to those HIV-uninfected, and PRR hyporesponsiveness for IL-8 was also found in the corresponding infant’s cord blood. HIV infection had a greater impact on placental blood responses, with significantly increased pro-inflammatory, TH1 and TH17 PRR responses in HIV-infected women not receiving ART before pregnancy compared to HIV-uninfected women. In conclusion, innate response of the mother and her newborn was altered by HIV infection in the women who did not receive ART before pregnancy. As these responses could be related to birth outcomes, targeted innate immune modulation could improve maternal and newborn health.

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