Data_Sheet_2_An Assessment of the Stability of the Canine Oral Microbiota After Probiotic Administration in Healthy Dogs Over Time.docx (27.9 kB)

Data_Sheet_2_An Assessment of the Stability of the Canine Oral Microbiota After Probiotic Administration in Healthy Dogs Over Time.docx

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posted on 11.09.2020 by Sara E. Bell, Andrea K. Nash, Brian M. Zanghi, Cynthia M. Otto, Erin B. Perry

The administration of an oral probiotic has been demonstrated to impact oral microbial diversity in humans but has not been examined in canines. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that oral probiotic administration would impact the oral microbiota of canines compared to control. Working canines in training (n = 13) were assigned to Test or Control groups and acclimated to one of three commercially available study diets utilizing common protein sources (Purina Pro Plan Savor lamb, Purina Pro Plan Sport chicken, Purina Pro Plan Focus salmon) for a minimum of 30 days prior to initiation of the study. Following acclimation, dogs in the Test group began a daily regimen of oral probiotic (Fortiflora® Purina, St. Louis, MO) top-dressed on their midday feeding. Control dogs received their midday feeding with no probiotic. All dogs were sampled once weekly via oral pediatric swabs across the 7-week study. Next generation sequencing (Illumina, MiSeq) was utilized to develop microbial profiles specific to treatment, diet, and time. Bacterial composition was dominated by eight phyla (Proteobacteria 43.8%, Bacteroidetes 22.5%, Firmicutes 18.9%, Actinobacteria 6.1%, Fusobacteria 3.6%, Gracilibacteria 2.1%, SR1 Absconditabacteria 1.5%, and Saccharibacteria 1.3%) representing more than 99% of the relative abundance of the microbial composition. Probiotic administration failed to impact relative abundance at any taxonomic level (P > 0.05). Similarly, no effect on the oral microbiota was measured for diet (P > 0.05). Comparison using a Jaccard Index demonstrate a consistent microbial profile over the 7-week study with no impact evidenced by study week (P = 0.19). The data also revealed a profile of ubiquitous taxa that were present across all dogs and all samples regardless of breed, sex, diet, treatment or other factors. These genera include Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, Capnocytophaga, Flavobacterium, Gemella, Abiotrophia, Streptococcus, and Frederiksenia. These data demonstrate the stability of canine oral microbiota over time.

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