Data_Sheet_2_All-Cause Mortality Risk Associated With Solid Fuel Use Among Chinese Elderly People: A National Retrospective Longitudinal Study.DOCX (620.05 kB)
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Data_Sheet_2_All-Cause Mortality Risk Associated With Solid Fuel Use Among Chinese Elderly People: A National Retrospective Longitudinal Study.DOCX

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posted on 14.10.2021, 04:30 authored by Shisi Shen, Min Luo, Xuchen Meng, Ying Deng, Shuwen Cheng

Background: The adverse health effects of air pollutants are widely reported, and the elderly are susceptible to toxic environments. This study aimed to evaluate the association between use of solid fuels for cooking and mortality among the elderly.

Methods: A total of 5,732 and 3,869 participants from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey were enrolled in two (2014 and 2018) and three surveys (2011, 2014, and 2018) of survey. Cooking fuel was divided into clean and solid fuel. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the mortality hazard ratio (HR). Subgroup analyses were performed to assess the potential interaction effect.

Results: Among the participants in the 2011–2018 survey, 53% reported using solid fuel. Such group was associated with a 9% increase in mortality risk relative to clean fuel users (HR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.01–1.18). Among participants in the 2014–2018 survey, 339 reported a switch from solid to clean fuels and they were not at increased mortality risk relative to the 488 people that reported a stable use of clean fuels (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.99–1.31) although the estimated HR was similar to the one for stable solid fuel users (HR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.04–1.36 n = 509). Interaction and stratified analyses showed that solid fuel use had an impact on mortality in participants who were non-current smokers, had low dietary diversity scores, and were living in areas with high PM2.5 concentrations (>50 μg/m3) and city population below 8 million (P for interaction < 0.05). The association was robust in the three sensitivity analyses.

Conclusion: The finding showed a clear association between solid fuel use and mortality among older Chinese, and an even stronger association between risk of mortality and solid fuel use among individuals exposed to high levels of PM2.5.

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