Data_Sheet_1_Who Is Next? A Study on Victims of Financial Fraud in Japan.PDF (123.05 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Who Is Next? A Study on Victims of Financial Fraud in Japan.PDF

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posted on 02.07.2021, 04:38 by Yoshihiko Kadoya, Mostafa Saidur Rahim Khan, Jin Narumoto, Satoshi Watanabe

Japan has seen an increase in the incidents of financial frauds over the last couple of decades. Although authorities are aware of the problem, an effective solution eludes them as fraudsters use innovative swindling methods and continually change the target group. Using a nationwide survey conducted by Hiroshima University, Japan, in 2020, this study investigated the socioeconomic and psychological profiles of victims of trending and special financial fraud such as fictitious billing fraud, loan guarantee fraud, and refund fraud. It was found that financial fraud victims' profiles are dissimilar at the aggregate and specific levels. At the specific level, victim profiles were diverse, that is, in fictitious billing fraud, loan guarantee fraud, and refund fraud cases. Males, married, and financially less satisfied people were more often victims of fictitious billing fraud; less anxious people were more likely victims of loan guarantee fraud; and older, asset-holding, and less-income-generating respondents were found to be victims of refund fraud. Our results also show some commonalities in the victims' profiles. For example, financially less-literate people were found to be more likely victims of fictitious billing fraud and loan guarantee fraud. Finally, respondents who lived with their family, those who did not have careful buying habits, and those who suffer from bouts of loneliness were found to be common victims of all types of special financial fraud. The results of our study suggest that a one-size-fits-all policy cannot effectively combat financial fraud.

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