Data_Sheet_1_Travel Planning Ability in Right Brain-Damaged Patients: Two Case Reports.DOCX (192.34 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Travel Planning Ability in Right Brain-Damaged Patients: Two Case Reports.DOCX

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posted on 31.03.2020, 12:58 authored by Alessia Bocchi, Massimiliano Palmiero, Maddalena Boccia, Antonella Di Vita, Cecilia Guariglia, Laura Piccardi

Planning ability is fundamental for goal-directed spatial navigation. Preliminary findings from patients and healthy individuals suggest that travel planning (TP)—namely, navigational planning—can be considered a distinct process from visuospatial planning (VP) ability. To shed light on this distinction, two right brain-damaged patients without hemineglect were compared with a control group on two tasks aimed at testing VP (i.e., Tower of London-16, ToL-16) and TP (i.e., Minefield Task, MFT). The former requires planning the moves to reach the right configuration of three colored beads on three pegs, whereas the latter was opportunely developed to assess TP in the navigational environment when obstacles are present. Specifically, the MFT requires participants to plan a route on a large carpet avoiding some hidden obstacles previously observed. Patient 1 showed lesions encompassing the temporoparietal region and the insula; she performed poorer than the control group on the ToL-16 but showed no deficit on the MFT. Conversely, Patient 2 showed lesions mainly located in the occipitoparietal network of spatial navigation; she performed worse than the control group on the MFT but not on the ToL-16. In both cases performances satisfied the criteria for a classical dissociation, meeting criteria for a double dissociation. These results support the idea that TP is a distinct ability and that it is dissociated from VP skills.

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