Data_Sheet_1_Transcriptomic and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Provide Insights Into the Phagocytic Killing of Hemocytes in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.docx (1.32 MB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Transcriptomic and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Provide Insights Into the Phagocytic Killing of Hemocytes in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.docx

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posted on 11.06.2018, 16:30 authored by Shuai Jiang, Limei Qiu, Lingling Wang, Zhihao Jia, Zhao Lv, Mengqiang Wang, Conghui Liu, Jiachao Xu, Linsheng Song

As invertebrates lack an adaptive immune system, they depend to a large extent on their innate immune system to recognize and clear invading pathogens. Although phagocytes play pivotal roles in invertebrate innate immunity, the molecular mechanisms underlying this killing remain unclear. Cells of this type from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were classified efficiently in this study via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) based on their phagocytosis of FITC-labeled latex beads. Transcriptomic and quantitative proteomic analyses revealed a series of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and proteins present in phagocytes; of the 352 significantly high expressed proteins identified here within the phagocyte proteome, 262 corresponding genes were similarly high expressed in the transcriptome, while 140 of 205 significantly low expressed proteins within the proteome were transcriptionally low expressed. A pathway crosstalk network analysis of these significantly high expressed proteins revealed that phagocytes were highly activated in a number of antimicrobial-related biological processes, including oxidation–reduction and lysosomal proteolysis processes. A number of DEGs, including oxidase, lysosomal protease, and immune receptors, were also validated in this study using quantitative PCR, while seven lysosomal cysteine proteases, referred to as cathepsin Ls, were significantly high expressed in phagocytes. Results show that the expression level of cathepsin L protein in phagocytes [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI): 327 ± 51] was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that in non-phagocytic hemocytes (MFI: 83 ± 26), while the cathepsin L protein was colocalized with the phagocytosed Vibrio splendidus in oyster hemocytes during this process. The results of this study collectively suggest that oyster phagocytes possess both potent oxidative killing and microbial disintegration capacities; these findings provide important insights into hemocyte phagocytic killing as a component of C. gigas innate immunity.

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