Data_Sheet_1_The Biodiversity–Biomass Relationship of Aquatic Macrophytes Is Regulated by Water Depth: A Case Study of a Shallow Mesotrophic Lake in C.docx (169.52 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_The Biodiversity–Biomass Relationship of Aquatic Macrophytes Is Regulated by Water Depth: A Case Study of a Shallow Mesotrophic Lake in China.docx

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posted on 07.06.2021, 04:12 authored by Fei Ma, Lei Yang, Tian Lv, Zhenjun Zuo, Haocun Zhao, Shufeng Fan, Chunhua Liu, Dan Yu

The relationship between biodiversity and productivity (or biomass production) (BPR) has been a popular topic in macroecology and debated for decades. However, this relationship is poorly understood in macrophyte communities, and the mechanism of the BPR pattern of the aquatic macrophyte community is not clear. We investigated 78 aquatic macrophyte communities in a shallow mesotrophic freshwater lake in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China. We analyzed the relationship between biodiversity (species richness, diversity, and evenness indices) and community biomass, and the effects of water environments and interspecific interactions on biodiversity–biomass patterns. Unimodal patterns between community biomass and diversity indices instead of evenness indices are shown, and these indicate the importance of both the number and abundance of species when studying biodiversity–biomass patterns under mesotrophic conditions. These patterns were moderated by species identity biologically and water depth environmentally. However, water depth determined the distribution and growth of species with different life-forms as well as species identities through environmental filtering. These results demonstrate that water depth regulates the biodiversity–biomass pattern of the aquatic macrophyte community as a result of its effect on species identity and species distribution. Our study may provide useful information for conservation and restoration of macrophyte vegetation in shallow lakes through matching water depth and species or life-form combinations properly to reach high ecosystem functions and services.

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