Data_Sheet_1_Sensory-to-Motor Overflow: Cooling Foot Soles Impedes Squat Jump Performance.PDF (16.21 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Sensory-to-Motor Overflow: Cooling Foot Soles Impedes Squat Jump Performance.PDF

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posted on 09.10.2020, 04:35 by Mia Caminita, Gina L. Garcia, Hyun Joon Kwon, Ross H. Miller, Jae Kun Shim

Evidence from recent studies on animals and humans suggest that neural overflow from the primary sensory cortex (S1) to the primary motor cortex (M1) may play a critical role in motor control. However, it is unclear if whole-body maximal motor tasks are also governed by this mechanism. Maximum vertical squat jumps were performed by 15 young adults before cooling, then immediately following a 15-min cooling period using an ice-water bath for the foot soles, and finally immediately following a 15-min period of natural recovery from cooling. Jump heights were, on average, 3.1 cm lower immediately following cooling compared to before cooling (p = 3.39 × 10−8) and 1.9 cm lower following natural recovery from cooling (p = 0.00124). The average vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) was also lower by 78.2 N in the condition immediately following cooling compared to before cooling (p = 8.1 × 10−5) and 56.7N lower following natural recovery from cooling (p = 0.0043). The current study supports the S1-to-M1 overflow mechanism in a whole-body dynamic jump.

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