Data_Sheet_1_Segregation of Unknown Odors From Mixtures Based on Stimulus Onset Asynchrony in Honey Bees.CSV (289.66 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Segregation of Unknown Odors From Mixtures Based on Stimulus Onset Asynchrony in Honey Bees.CSV

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posted on 12.07.2019 by Aarti Sehdev, Paul Szyszka

Animals use olfaction to search for distant objects. Unlike vision, where objects are spaced out, olfactory information mixes when it reaches olfactory organs. Therefore, efficient olfactory search requires segregating odors that are mixed with background odors. Animals can segregate known odors by detecting short differences in the arrival of mixed odorants (stimulus onset asynchrony). However, it is unclear whether animals can also use stimulus onset asynchrony to segregate odorants that they had no previous experience with and which have no innate or learned relevance (unknown odorants). Using behavioral experiments in honey bees, we here show that stimulus onset asynchrony also improves segregation of those unknown odorants. The stimulus onset asynchrony necessary to segregate unknown odorants is in the range of seconds, which is two orders of magnitude larger than the previously reported stimulus asynchrony sufficient for segregating known odorants. We propose that for unknown odorants, segregating odorant A from a mixture with B requires sensory adaptation to B.

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