Data_Sheet_1_School- and Leisure Time Factors Are Associated With Sitting Time of German and Irish Children and Adolescents During School: Results of .docx (105.36 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_School- and Leisure Time Factors Are Associated With Sitting Time of German and Irish Children and Adolescents During School: Results of a DEDIPAC Feasibility Study.docx

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posted on 23.07.2020, 04:17 authored by Johanna Sophie Lubasch, Barbara Thumann, Jens Bucksch, Lara Kim Brackmann, Norman Wirsik, Alan Donnelly, Grainne Hayes, Katharina Nimptsch, Astrid Steinbrecher, Tobias Pischon, Johannes Brug, Wolfgang Ahrens, Antje Hebestreit

Objective: The study aims to investigate to what extent school- and leisure time-related factors are associated with sedentary behavior during school in German and Irish children and adolescents.

Methods: The study based on a sample of 198 children and adolescents surveyed in 2015. Sedentary and activity behavior were measured using the activPAL physical activity monitor. Information on socio-economic status, school- and leisure-time related factors were provided by questionnaires. Associations between school- and leisure time-related factors and sedentary time during school were estimated using linear multi-level models.

Results: Access to play equipment in school was associated with reduced sitting time (hours/day) of children (ß = 0.78; 95%CI = 0.06–1.48). Media devices in bedroom and assessing the neighborhood as activity friendly was associated with increased sitting time of children (ß = 0.92; 95%CI = 0.12–1.72 and ß = 0.30; 95%CI = 0.01–0.60, respectively). The permission to use media devices during breaks was associated with increased sitting time (hours/day) of adolescents (ß = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.06–0.69). A less safe traffic surrounding at school was associated with reduced sitting time of adolescents (ß = −0.42; 95% CI = −0.80 to −0.03).

Conclusion: Results suggest that school- and leisure time-related factors are associated to the sedentary behavior during school. We suggest that future strategies to reduce sedentary time should consider both contexts.

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