Data_Sheet_1_Responses of Marine Diatom-Dinoflagellate Competition to Multiple Environmental Drivers: Abundance, Elemental, and Biochemical Aspects.docx (900.63 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Responses of Marine Diatom-Dinoflagellate Competition to Multiple Environmental Drivers: Abundance, Elemental, and Biochemical Aspects.docx

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posted on 30.08.2021, 05:38 by Rong Bi, Zhong Cao, Stefanie M. H. Ismar-Rebitz, Ulrich Sommer, Hailong Zhang, Yang Ding, Meixun Zhao

Ocean-related global change has strongly affected the competition between key marine phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms and dinoflagellates, especially with the deleterious consequency of the increasing occurrence of harmful algal blooms. The dominance of diatoms generally shifts toward that of dinoflagellates in response to increasing temperature and reduced nutrient availability; however, contradictory findings have also been observed in certain sea areas. A key challenge in ecology and biogeochemistry is to quantitatively determine the effects of multiple environmental factors on the diatom-dinoflagellate community and the related changes in elemental and biochemical composition. Here, we test the interplay between temperature, nutrient concentrations and their ratios on marine diatom-dinoflagellate competition and chemical composition using bi-algal competition experiments. The ubiquitous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum were cultivated semi-continuously, provided with different N and P concentrations (three different levels) and ratios (10:1, 24:1, and 63:1 molar ratios) under three temperatures (12, 18, and 24°C). The responses of diatom-dinoflagellate competition were analyzed by a Lotka-Volterra model and quantified by generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). The changes in nutrient concentrations significantly affected diatom-dinoflagellate competition, causing a competitive superiority of the diatoms at high nutrient concentrations, independent of temperature and N:P supply ratios. Interestingly, the effect amplitude of nutrient concentrations varied with different temperatures, showing a switch back toward a competitive superiority of the dinoflagellates at the highest temperature and at very high nutrient concentrations. The ratios of particulate organic nitrogen to phosphorus showed significant negative correlations with increasing diatoms/dinoflagellates ratios, while lipid biomarkers (fatty acids and sterols) correlated positively with increasing diatoms/dinoflagellates ratios over the entire ranges of temperature, N and P concentrations and N:P ratios. Our results indicate that the integration of phytoplankton community structure and chemical composition provides an important step forward to quantitatively understand and predict how phytoplankton community changes affect ecosystem functions and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean.

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