Data_Sheet_1_Real-Time Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Detection and Quantification of Exogenously Administered Melatonin in Mice Brain.PDF (963 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Real-Time Fast Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Detection and Quantification of Exogenously Administered Melatonin in Mice Brain.PDF

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posted on 24.11.2020, 04:12 by Elisa Castagnola, Elaine M. Robbins, Kevin M. Woeppel, Moriah McGuier, Asiyeh Golabchi, I. Mitch Taylor, Adrian C. Michael, Xinyan Tracy Cui

Melatonin (MT) has been recently considered an excellent candidate for the treatment of sleep disorders, neural injuries, and neurological diseases. To better investigate the actions of MT in various brain functions, real-time detection of MT concentrations in specific brain regions is much desired. Previously, we have demonstrated detection of exogenously administered MT in anesthetized mouse brain using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Here, for the first time, we show successful detection of exogenous MT in the brain using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) on electrochemically pre-activated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs). In vitro evaluation showed the highest sensitivity (28.1 nA/μM) and lowest detection limit (20.2 ± 4.8 nM) ever reported for MT detection at carbon surface. Additionally, an extensive CFE stability and fouling assessment demonstrated that a prolonged CFE pre-conditioning stabilizes the background, in vitro and in vivo, and provides consistent CFE sensitivity over time even in the presence of a high MT concentration. Finally, the stable in vivo background, with minimized CFE fouling, allows us to achieve a drift-free FSCV detection of exogenous administered MT in mouse brain over a period of 3 min, which is significantly longer than the duration limit (usually < 90 s) for traditional in vivo FSCV acquisition. The MT concentration and dynamics measured by FSCV are in good agreement with SWV, while microdialysis further validated the concentration range. These results demonstrated reliable MT detection using FSCV that has the potential to monitor MT in the brain over long periods of time.

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