Data_Sheet_1_Quantitative Identification of Major Depression Based on Resting-State Dynamic Functional Connectivity: A Machine Learning Approach.docx (567.07 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Quantitative Identification of Major Depression Based on Resting-State Dynamic Functional Connectivity: A Machine Learning Approach.docx

Download (567.07 kB)
dataset
posted on 27.03.2020, 09:25 by Baoyu Yan, Xiaopan Xu, Mengwan Liu, Kaizhong Zheng, Jian Liu, Jianming Li, Lei Wei, Binjie Zhang, Hongbing Lu, Baojuan Li
Introduction

Developing a machine learning-based approach which could provide quantitative identification of major depressive disorder (MDD) is essential for the diagnosis and intervention of this disorder. However, the performances of traditional algorithms using static functional connectivity (SFC) measures were unsatisfactory. In the present work, we exploit the hidden information embedded in dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) and developed an accurate and objective image-based diagnosis system for MDD.

Methods

MRI images were collected from 99 participants including 56 healthy controls and 43 MDD patients. DFC was calculated using a sliding-window algorithm. A non-linear support vector machine (SVM) approach was then used with the DFC matrices as features to distinguish MDD patients from healthy controls. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the most discriminative features were then investigated.

Results

The area under the curve (AUC) of the SVM classifier with DFC measures reached 0.9913, while this value is only 0.8685 for the algorithm using SFC measures. Spatially, the most discriminative 28 connections distributed in the visual network (VN), somatomotor network (SMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), ventral attention network (VAN), limbic network (LN), frontoparietal network (FPN), and default mode network (DMN), etc. Notably, a large portion of these connections were associated with the FPN, DMN, and VN. Temporally, the most discriminative connections transited from the cortex to deeper regions.

Conclusion

The results clearly suggested that DFC is superior to SFC and provide a reliable quantitative identification method for MDD. Our findings may furnish a better understanding of the neural mechanisms of MDD as well as improve accurate diagnosis and early intervention of this disorder.

History

References

Licence

Exports