Data_Sheet_1_Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasB Subverts Alveolar Macrophage Activity by Interfering With Bacterial Killing Through Downregulation of Innate Immune Defense, Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, and Complement Activation.zip (10.86 MB)

Data_Sheet_1_Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasB Subverts Alveolar Macrophage Activity by Interfering With Bacterial Killing Through Downregulation of Innate Immune Defense, Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, and Complement Activation.zip

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posted on 23.07.2018 by Fabien Bastaert, Saadé Kheir, Vinciane Saint-Criq, Bérengère Villeret, Pham My-Chan Dang, Jamel El-Benna, Jean-Claude Sirard, Romé Voulhoux, Jean-Michel Sallenave

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a) is a pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality, in particular, in hospital patients undergoing ventilation and in patients with cystic fibrosis. Among the virulence factors secreted or injected into host cells, the physiopathological relevance of type II secretions system (T2SS) is less studied. Although there is extensive literature on the destructive role of LasB in vitro on secreted innate immune components and on some stromal cell receptors, studies on its direct action on myeloid cells are scant. Using a variety of methods, including the use of bacterial mutants, gene-targeted mice, and proteomics technology, we show here, using non-opsonic conditions (thus mimicking resting and naïve conditions in the alveolar space), that LasB, an important component of the P.a T2SS is highly virulent in vivo, and can subvert alveolar macrophage (AM) activity and bacterial killing, in vitro and in vivo by downregulating important secreted innate immune molecules (complement factors, cytokines, etc.) and receptors (IFNAR, Csf1r, etc.). In particular, we show that LasB downregulates the production of C3 and factor B complement molecules, as well as the activation of reactive oxygen species production by AM. In addition, we showed that purified LasB impaired significantly the ability of AM to clear an unrelated bacterium, namely Streptococcus pneumoniae. These data provide a new mechanism of action for LasB, potentially partly explaining the early onset of P.a, alone, or with other bacteria, within the alveolar lumen in susceptible individuals, such as ventilated, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis patients.

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