Data_Sheet_1_Polynomial, piecewise-Linear, Step (PLS): A Simple, Scalable, and Efficient Framework for Modeling Neurons.PDF (1.07 MB)
Download file

Data_Sheet_1_Polynomial, piecewise-Linear, Step (PLS): A Simple, Scalable, and Efficient Framework for Modeling Neurons.PDF

Download (1.07 MB)
dataset
posted on 06.05.2021, 04:39 by Ruben A. Tikidji-Hamburyan, Matthew T. Colonnese

Biological neurons can be modeled with different levels of biophysical/biochemical details. The accuracy with which a model reflects the actual physiological processes and ultimately the information function of a neuron, can range from very detailed to a schematic phenomenological representation. This range exists due to the common problem: one needs to find an optimal trade-off between the level of details needed to capture the necessary information processing in a neuron and the computational load needed to compute 1 s of model time. An increase in modeled network size or model-time, for which the solution should be obtained, makes this trade-off pivotal in model development. Numerical simulations become incredibly challenging when an extensive network with a detailed representation of each neuron needs to be modeled over a long time interval to study slow evolving processes, e.g., development of the thalamocortical circuits. Here we suggest a simple, powerful and flexible approach in which we approximate the right-hand sides of differential equations by combinations of functions from three families: Polynomial, piecewise-Linear, Step (PLS). To obtain a single coherent framework, we provide four core principles in which PLS functions should be combined. We show the rationale behind each of the core principles. Two examples illustrate how to build a conductance-based or phenomenological model using the PLS-framework. We use the first example as a benchmark on three different computational platforms: CPU, GPU, and mobile system-on-chip devices. We show that the PLS-framework speeds up computations without increasing the memory footprint and maintains high model fidelity comparable to the fully-computed model or with lookup-table approximation. We are convinced that the full range of neuron models: from biophysical to phenomenological and even to abstract models, may benefit from using the PLS-framework.

History

References