Data_Sheet_1_Peripheral Blood Classical Monocytes and Plasma Interleukin 10 Are Associated to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Patie.docx (314.35 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Peripheral Blood Classical Monocytes and Plasma Interleukin 10 Are Associated to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Patients.docx

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posted on 09.07.2020, 04:18 by Javier Valdés-Ferrada, Natalia Muñoz-Durango, Alejandra Pérez-Sepulveda, Sabrina Muñiz, Irenice Coronado-Arrázola, Francisco Acevedo, Jorge A. Soto, Susan M. Bueno, Cesar Sánchez, Alexis M. Kalergis

Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) is the leading cause of cancer death among women. For many patients the most effective treatment is a resection surgery that removes the tumor. Within this subset, patients sometimes receive chemotherapy treatment (CT) prior to surgery aiming to reduce tumor size in order to preserve healthy breast tissue. This strategy is commonly called neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). This approach also offers an opportunity to determine treatment sensitivity, especially in aggressive tumors. Post NAC absence of residual disease is associated to long term survival in BC patients and is used to define the need of adjuvant therapy options. Studies suggest that NAC allows the recognition of tumor antigens by immune cells potentiating the eradication of the tumor. However, the dynamic changes in patients' immune cells under NAC remain unclear. Here, we assessed changes in leucocyte and cytokine profiles in order to determine its association to NAC response in BC patients. Peripheral blood patient samples were taken prior to each NAC cycle to assess the abundance of leukocyte subsets and serum cytokines in 20 patients. These immunological features were associated with clinical outcomes including pathological response. We found a positive correlation between plasma Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and classical monocytes in HER2+ BC patients under NAC. We also observed a trend between increased IL-10 and classical monocytes levels and lower rates of pathologic complete response at the end of NAC. These data support the notion that monocyte subsets and IL-10 could be applied as a novel indicator of NAC efficacy in HER2+ BC patients. Finally, we confirm a key role of the immune system in cancer progression and CT response.

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