Data_Sheet_1_Parallelized Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulations for Arbitrary Multi-Angle Wide-Field Illumination in Optoacoustic Imaging.pdf (234.81 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Parallelized Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulations for Arbitrary Multi-Angle Wide-Field Illumination in Optoacoustic Imaging.pdf

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posted on 31.07.2020, 14:02 authored by Tong Lu, Jiao Li, Tingting Chen, Shichao Miao, Shuai Li, Xinyang Xu, Feng Gao

Optoacoustic imaging (OAI) or photoacoustic imaging can resolve the distribution of tissue chromophores and optical contrast agents deep inside tissue from the optoacoustic detection with multi-spectral illumination. The development of a fast and accurate modeling method for the photon transport in OAI is necessary to quantitatively evaluate the tissue optical parameters. This paper presents a parallelized Monte Carlo modeling method especially for OAI (MCOAI) to simulate photon transport in bio-tissues with arbitrary multi-angle wide-field illumination. The performance of the MCOAI method is verified by comparison with the graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated MCX method in the typical cases with the pencil beam and ring source illumination. The simulation results demonstrate the GPU-based MCOAI method has equivalent accuracy and significantly improved computation efficiency, compared to the MCX method. The simulations with cylindrical and hemispherical source illumination further illustrate that the MCOAI method can effectively implement three-dimensional photon transport simulation for typical illumination geometries of OAI systems. A cross-section of Digimouse is selected as a realistic heterogeneous phantom illuminated with six different light sources usually employed in OAI, in order to prove the necessity of establishing photon transport modeling in OAI for the quantitative visualization in deep tissues. The MCOAI method can provide a powerful tool to efficiently establish photon transport modeling with arbitrary illumination modes for OAI applications.

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