Data_Sheet_1_Modeling the Growth and Interaction Between Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., and Leuconostoc gelidum in Minced Pork Samples.docx (26.08 MB)

Data_Sheet_1_Modeling the Growth and Interaction Between Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., and Leuconostoc gelidum in Minced Pork Samples.docx

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posted on 09.04.2020 by Emilie Cauchie, Laurent Delhalle, Ghislain Baré, Assia Tahiri, Bernard Taminiau, Nicolas Korsak, Sophie Burteau, Papa Abdoulaye Fall, Frédéric Farnir, Georges Daube

The aim of this study was to obtain the growth parameters of specific spoilage micro-organisms previously isolated in minced pork (MP) samples and to develop a three-spoilage species interaction model under different storage conditions. Naturally contaminated samples were used to validate this approach by considering the effect of the food microbiota. Three groups of bacteria were inoculated on irradiated samples, in mono- and in co-culture experiments (n = 1152): Brochothrix thermosphacta, Leuconostoc gelidum, and Pseudomonas spp. (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas fragi). Samples were stored in two food packaging [food wrap and modified atmosphere packaging (CO2 30%/O2 70%)] at three isothermal conditions (4, 8, and 12°C). Analysis was carried out by using both 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and classical microbiology in order to estimate bacterial counts during the storage period. Growth parameters were obtained by fitting primary (Baranyi) and secondary (square root) models. The food packaging shows the highest impact on bacterial growth rates, which in turn have the strongest influence on the shelf life of food products. Based on these results, a three-spoilage species interaction model was developed by using the modified Jameson-effect model and the Lotka Volterra (prey–predator) model. The modified Jameson-effect model showed slightly better performances, with 40–86% out of the observed counts falling into the Acceptable Simulation Zone (ASZ). It only concerns 14–48% for the prey–predator approach. These results can be explained by the fact that the dynamics of experimental and validation datasets seems to follow a Jameson behavior. On the other hand, the Lotka Volterra model is based on complex interaction factors, which are included in highly variable intervals. More datasets are probably needed to obtained reliable factors, and so better model fittings, especially for three- or more-spoilage species interaction models. Further studies are also needed to better understand the interaction of spoilage bacteria between them and in the presence of natural microbiota.

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