Data_Sheet_1_Mining for New Sources of Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Genetic Resources of Winter Wheat.CSV (8.74 kB)
Download file

Data_Sheet_1_Mining for New Sources of Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Genetic Resources of Winter Wheat.CSV

Download (8.74 kB)
dataset
posted on 01.03.2022, 04:52 authored by Valentin Hinterberger, Dimitar Douchkov, Stefanie Lück, Sandip Kale, Martin Mascher, Nils Stein, Jochen C. Reif, Albert W. Schulthess

Genetic pathogen control is an economical and sustainable alternative to the use of chemicals. In order to breed resistant varieties, information about potentially unused genetic resistance mechanisms is of high value. We phenotyped 8,316 genotypes of the winter wheat collection of the German Federal ex situ gene bank for Agricultural and Horticultural Crops, Germany, for resistance to powdery mildew (PM), Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, one of the most important biotrophic pathogens in wheat. To achieve this, we used a semi-automatic phenotyping facility to perform high-throughput detached leaf assays. This data set, combined with genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) marker data, was used to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Alleles of significantly associated markers were compared with SNP profiles of 171 widely grown wheat varieties in Germany to identify currently unexploited resistance conferring genes. We also used the Chinese Spring reference genome annotation and various domain prediction algorithms to perform a domain enrichment analysis and produced a list of candidate genes for further investigation. We identified 51 significantly associated regions. In most of these, the susceptible allele was fixed in the tested commonly grown wheat varieties. Eleven of these were located on chromosomes for which no resistance conferring genes have been previously reported. In addition to enrichment of leucine-rich repeats (LRR), we saw enrichment of several domain types so far not reported as relevant to PM resistance, thus, indicating potentially novel candidate genes for the disease resistance research and prebreeding in wheat.

History

References