Data_Sheet_1_Microbiome and Metabolomics Reveal the Effects of Different Feeding Systems on the Growth and Ruminal Development of Yaks.PDF (185.73 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Microbiome and Metabolomics Reveal the Effects of Different Feeding Systems on the Growth and Ruminal Development of Yaks.PDF

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posted on 24.06.2021, 15:12 authored by Chun Huang, Fei Ge, Xixi Yao, Xian Guo, Pengjia Bao, Xiaoming Ma, Xiaoyun Wu, Min Chu, Ping Yan, Chunnian Liang

The change in the feeding system can greatly improve the growth performance of the yak (Bos grunniens), an important livestock species in the plateau region. Here, we comprehensively compared the effects of different feeding systems on the growth performance and ruminal development of yaks, and investigated the effects of ruminal microorganisms and metabolites using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing and liquid chromatograph–mass spectrometer (LC-MS) technologies. We found that compared to traditional grazing feeding, house feeding significantly improved the growth performance (such as average daily gain and net meat weight) and rumen development of the yaks. At the genus level, the abundance of Rikenellaceae RC9 Gut group, Christensenellaceae R-7 group, Lachnospiraceae NK3A20 group, Ruminococcaceae UCG-014, and Prevotellaceae UCG-003 showed significant differences and was closely related to rumen development in the two distinct feeding systems. Also, metabolomics revealed that the change in the feeding system significantly affected the concentration and metabolic pathways of the related rumen metabolites. The metabolites with significant differences were significantly enriched in purine metabolism (xanthine, adenine, inosine, etc.), tyrosine metabolism (L-tyrosine, dopaquinone, etc.), phenylalanine metabolism (dihydro-3-caumaric acid, hippuric acid, etc.), and cAMP signaling pathway [acetylcholine, (-)-epinephrine, etc.]. This study scientifically support the house fattening feeding system for yaks. Also, our results provide new insights into the composition and function of microbial communities that promote ruminal development and in general growth of the yaks.

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