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Data_Sheet_1_IL-33 Is Essential for Adjuvant Effect of Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodexrin on the Protective Intranasal Influenza Vaccination.docx (1.03 MB)

Data_Sheet_1_IL-33 Is Essential for Adjuvant Effect of Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodexrin on the Protective Intranasal Influenza Vaccination.docx

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posted on 2020-03-06, 15:20 authored by Shingo Kobari, Takato Kusakabe, Masatoshi Momota, Takayuki Shibahara, Tomoya Hayashi, Koji Ozasa, Hideaki Morita, Kenji Matsumoto, Hirohisa Saito, Shuichi Ito, Etsushi Kuroda, Ken J. Ishii

Vaccine adjuvants are traditionally used to augment and modulate the immunogenicity of vaccines, although in many cases it is unclear which specific molecules contribute to their stimulatory activity. We previously reported that both subcutaneous and intranasal administration of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), a pharmaceutical excipient widely used to improve solubility, can act as an effective adjuvant for an influenza vaccine. However, the mechanisms by which mucosal immune pathway is critical for the intranasal adjuvant activity of HP-β-CD have not been fully delineated. Here, we show that intranasally administered HP-β-CD elicits a temporary release of IL-33 from alveolar epithelial type 2 cells in the lung; notably, IL-33 expression in these cells is not stimulated following the use of other vaccine adjuvants. The experiments using gene deficient mice suggested that IL-33/ST2 signaling is solely responsible for the adjuvant effect of HP-β-CD when it is administered intranasally. In contrast, the subcutaneous injection of HP-β-CD and the intranasal administration of alum, as a damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)-inducing adjuvant, or cholera toxin, as a mucosal adjuvant, enhanced humoral immunity in an IL-33-independent manner, suggesting that the IL-33/ST2 pathway is unique to the adjuvanticity of intranasally administered HP-β-CD. Furthermore, the release of IL-33 was involved in the protective immunity against influenza virus infection which is induced by the intranasal administration of HP-β-CD-adjuvanted influenza split vaccine. In conclusion, our results suggest that an understanding of administration route- and tissue-specific immune responses is crucial for the design of unique vaccine adjuvants.

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