Data_Sheet_1_Effects of Real-Time (Sonification) and Rhythmic Auditory Stimuli on Recovering Arm Function Post Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.DOCX (70.16 kB)

Data_Sheet_1_Effects of Real-Time (Sonification) and Rhythmic Auditory Stimuli on Recovering Arm Function Post Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.DOCX

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posted on 13.07.2018, 04:18 by Shashank Ghai

Background: External auditory stimuli have been widely used for recovering arm function post-stroke. Rhythmic and real-time auditory stimuli have been reported to enhance motor recovery by facilitating perceptuomotor representation, cross-modal processing, and neural plasticity. However, a consensus as to their influence for recovering arm function post-stroke is still warranted because of high variability noted in research methods.

Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis was carried out to analyze the effects of rhythmic and real-time auditory stimuli on arm recovery post stroke.

Method: Systematic identification of published literature was performed according to PRISMA guidelines, from inception until December 2017, on online databases: Web of science, PEDro, EBSCO, MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, and PROQUEST. Studies were critically appraised using PEDro scale.

Results: Of 1,889 records, 23 studies which involved 585 (226 females/359 males) patients met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis revealed beneficial effects of training with both types of auditory inputs for Fugl-Meyer assessment (Hedge's g: 0.79), Stroke impact scale (0.95), elbow range of motion (0.37), and reduction in wolf motor function time test (−0.55). Upon further comparison, a beneficial effect of real-time auditory feedback was found over rhythmic auditory cueing for Fugl-meyer assessment (1.3 as compared to 0.6). Moreover, the findings suggest a training dosage of 30 min to 1 h for at least 3–5 sessions per week with either of the auditory stimuli.

Conclusion: This review suggests the application of external auditory stimuli for recovering arm functioning post-stroke.

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