Data_Sheet_1_Development and Testing of SPIDER-NET: An Interactive Tool for Brain Connectogram Visualization, Sub-Network Exploration and Graph Metric.ZIP (2.99 MB)
Download file

Data_Sheet_1_Development and Testing of SPIDER-NET: An Interactive Tool for Brain Connectogram Visualization, Sub-Network Exploration and Graph Metrics Quantification.ZIP

Download (2.99 MB)
dataset
posted on 17.03.2022, 04:31 authored by Davide Coluzzi, Alice Pirastru, Laura Pelizzari, Monia Cabinio, Maria Marcella Laganà, Giuseppe Baselli, Francesca Baglio

Brain connectomics consists in the modeling of human brain as networks, mathematically represented as numerical connectivity matrices. However, this representation may result in difficult interpretation of the data. To overcome this limitation, graphical representation by connectograms is currently used via open-source tools, which, however, lack user-friendly interfaces and options to explore specific sub-networks. In this context, we developed SPIDER-NET (Software Package Ideal for Deriving Enhanced Representations of brain NETworks), an easy-to-use, flexible, and interactive tool for connectograms generation and sub-network exploration. This study aims to present SPIDER-NET and to test its potential impact on pilot cases. As a working example, structural connectivity (SC) was investigated with SPIDER-NET in a group of 17 healthy controls (HCs) and in two subjects with stroke injury (Case 1 and Case 2, both with a focal lesion affecting part of the right frontal lobe, insular cortex and subcortical structures). 165 parcels were determined from individual structural magnetic resonance imaging data by using the Destrieux atlas, and defined as nodes. SC matrices were derived with Diffusion Tensor Imaging tractography. SC matrices of HCs were averaged to obtain a single group matrix. SC matrices were then used as input for SPIDER-NET. First, SPIDER-NET was used to derive the connectogram of the right hemisphere of Case 1 and Case 2. Then, a sub-network of interest (i.e., including gray matter regions affected by the stroke lesions) was interactively selected and the associated connectograms were derived for Case 1, Case 2 and HCs. Finally, graph-based metrics were derived for whole-brain SC matrices of Case 1, Case 2 and HCs. The software resulted effective in representing the expected (dis) connectivity pattern in the hemisphere affected by the stroke lesion in Cases 1 and 2. Furthermore, SPIDER-NET allowed to test an a priori hypothesis by interactively extracting a sub-network of interest: Case 1 showed a sub-network connectivity pattern different from Case 2, reflecting the different clinical severity. Global and local graph-based metrics derived with SPIDER-NET were different between cases with stroke injury and HCs. The tool proved to be accessible, intuitive, and interactive in brain connectivity investigation and provided both qualitative and quantitative evidence.

History

References