Data_Sheet_1_Cost Efficacy of Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.pdf (407.31 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Cost Efficacy of Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.pdf

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posted on 24.01.2022, 04:34 by Erica Sanford Kobayashi, Bryce Waldman, Branden M. Engorn, Katherine Perofsky, Erika Allred, Benjamin Briggs, Chelsea Gatcliffe, Nanda Ramchandar, Jeffrey J. Gold, Ami Doshi, Elizabeth G. Ingulli, Courtney D. Thornburg, Wendy Benson, Lauge Farnaes, Shimul Chowdhury, Seema Rego, Charlotte Hobbs, Stephen F. Kingsmore, David P. Dimmock, Nicole G. Coufal

The diagnostic and clinical utility of rapid whole genome sequencing (rWGS) for critically ill children in the intensive care unit (ICU) has been substantiated by multiple studies, but comprehensive cost-effectiveness evaluation of rWGS in the ICU outside of the neonatal age group is lacking. In this study, we examined cost data retrospectively for a cohort of 38 children in a regional pediatric ICU (PICU) who received rWGS. We identified seven of 17 patients who received molecular diagnoses by rWGS and had resultant changes in clinical management with sufficient clarity to permit cost and quality adjusted life years (QALY) modeling. Cost of PICU care was estimated to be reduced by $184,846 and a total of 12.1 QALYs were gained among these seven patients. The total cost of rWGS for patients and families for the entire cohort (38 probands) was $239,400. Thus, the net cost of rWGS was $54,554, representing $4,509 per QALY gained. This quantitative, retrospective examination of healthcare utilization associated with rWGS-informed medicine interventions in the PICU revealed approximately one-third of a QALY gained per patient tested at a cost per QALY that was approximately one-tenth of that typically sought for cost-effective new medical interventions. This evidence suggests that performance of rWGS as a first-tier test in selected PICU children with diseases of unknown etiology is associated with acceptable cost-per-QALY gained.

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