Data_Sheet_1_Contemporary Trends and Risk Factors of Hemodynamic and Myocardial Mechanics Derived by the Pressure Recording Analytical Method After Pe.docx (30.31 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Contemporary Trends and Risk Factors of Hemodynamic and Myocardial Mechanics Derived by the Pressure Recording Analytical Method After Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass.docx

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posted on 20.07.2021, 04:06 by Xiaobin Lou, Yingying Liu, Yanqin Cui, Jianbin Li, Lijuan Li, Li Ma, Minghui Zou, Xinxin Chen, Jia Li

Objective: Adverse factors of postoperative hemodynamic and myocardial performance remain largely unexplored in children with congenital heart disease following cardiopulmonary bypass due to technical limitations. Pressure recording analytical method (PRAM) is a continuous hemodynamic and myocardial performance monitoring technique based on beat-to-beat arterial pressure waveform. Using PRAM, we examined the temporal trends and adverse factors, in clinical management, of these performances.

Methods: We monitored blood pressure, cardiac index, cardiac cycle efficiency (CCE), dP/dTmax, and systematic vascular resistance index in 91 children (aged 186 ± 256 days) during their first 48 h after cardiopulmonary bypass. Above parameters, inotropic and vasoactive drug dosages, and serum lactate were recorded 3-hourly. NT-proBNP was measured daily.

Results: CCE and dP/dTmax gradually increased (Ps < 0.0001), while systematic vascular resistance index, diastolic blood pressure and inotrope dosages decreased (Ps < 0.0001) over time. Cardiac index, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate did not change significantly (Ps ≥ 0.231). Patients undergoing deep hypothermic circulatory arrest had significantly higher heart rate and lower CCE (Ps ≤ 0.006) over time. Multivariate analyses indicated that epinephrine dose significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure, cardiac index, CCE, and dP/dTmax after polynomial transformation, with the peak ranging from 0.075 to 0.097.

Conclusions: Systemic hemodynamic and myocardial performance gradually improved in the first 48 h after cardiopulmonary bypass without the “classic” nadir at 9–12 h. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and higher epinephrine doses were adversely associated with these performances. CCE, rather than cardiac index or other common-used parameters, was the most sensitive and consistent indicator.

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